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3D Printing Tactile Map Can Help Visually Impaired Students On Campus For Navigation
Oct 09, 2018

3D printing has been in a variety of ways to improve the lives of the blind and visually impaired people.Tactile map of 3D printing, 3D printing of smart glasses and 3D printing for the blind braille reader have made contributions to the cause, but there are endless new method can be used to add material manufacturing to let eyesight is not very good life easier.


    Legal requirements marked the emergency exit route map posted in public buildings, but the map is basically useless for the visually impaired.Thank visualization expert at the university of south Florida in Tampa, is located in Howard Kaplan, the maps of some unique 3D printing touch version could soon be offering for visually impaired people.


    "I can't imagine without my vision navigation," kaplan said, he is a high visualization is a doctoral student of center.What do you think of this for granted.So, when you see students, family and friends to be able to successfully manage and make a contribution to society, we can at least provide them with tools we have.


    Kaplan has developed a coding system, can create the sense of touch symbol, make sure they have the appropriate height, texture and depth, for the right finger navigation.Then use the plastic wire for 3D printing.So far, six is the classroom (CRP 103, 1048, CIS CMC118, ENG, 118, 1300, state-controlled bharat sanchar nigam EDU 316) has been coding, including the location of the emergency exits, the door is push or pull and whether there are stairs and other details.

    "It is important to note that the room is not flat floor, with their rise, highly increase gradually, so when a student entered the room without vision, they will not stumble, and they can be more accurate navigation in the room, security and independence," kaplan said.